Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

FW: My first effort at an intro for HARMONIC EXPLORER

Expand Messages
  • Ernest McClain
    I think I need to share this with other friends who are trying to help. Ernest From: Ernest McClain [mailto:ErnestMcC@verizon.net] Sent: Monday, April 30, 2012
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 30, 2012

      I think I need to share this with other friends who are trying to help. Ernest

       

      From: Ernest McClain [mailto:ErnestMcC@...]
      Sent: Monday, April 30, 2012 9:56 AM
      To: 'Richard Heath'
      Subject: RE: My first effort at an intro for HARMONIC EXPLORER

       

      Dear Richard: I read your first reaction with much interest. I’m totally dedicated to Sumer myself, and the Gilgamesh epic fully supports your notions here. I started with Plato, trying to suppress all else, because of the vast attention to his work that I believe corrupts all of us by its oversights, but establishes a facticity that anchors my investigation. I omitted two critical ideas that I yet must work into my investigation, but I needed to get away from the document for a few days to recover perspective. I must introduce his “prime 7” and clarify his use of factorial 6 and factorial 7, that I believe HE can handle with the addition of no more than another page. The question then becomes, are these 6 pages too much for one unit.

       

      I can start anytime to pull the Sumerian stuff together, but it seems I should let you outline  your own thoughts first. This fits the British Museum attention to games (and Finkle’s contributions as Dumbrill’s co-editor, which I already own, and Dominique Collon’s brilliant brief book on Inana. So what you want is already on my table and ready to go. For everlasting common sense, Sumer reigns forever. And we might want to use Sumer instead of Plato as an intro to HE, but maybe not. I want us to cover every surviving Sumerian story (only about 10) and make that our real showcase. But scholarship in Plato requires this reversal of academic conceit, my current feeling. And for children just learning math, I think you and  your brother will want to lay out a basic path as you see it today. I suspect, however, that we shall find ancient algorithms too valuable to ignore in doing so.

       

      Edit as you please for now, or continue as  you propose here. I might have another reasonably good year. I’m trying to learn to walk again. I cannot handle the one flight of stairs during our fire alarms, which are periodic. Take it for granted that I can drop out at any time. My son RON is my legal representative, and would like to see me get everything possible out for free on my own website. I keep  him informed about you, and I anticipate a smooth cooperation between you if one is necessary. Duane Christensen has a complete file of my productions in the last 10 years, and permission to use any of it.  And Richard Dumbrill is now publishing my second big essay with the musical math, and so has copyright interests that require respect. But I see nothing that need cause you concern—but you are far more alert to web politics and laws.

       

      I will read my own HE Intro again in another day or two, hoping for further comments from you before I correct anything again. I know you have an excellent sense of organization. I thought I made considerable progress in the last three months that I’ve been working on HE. I consider your lunar zodiac the most convenient route to exploit, via India and the RgVeda also. We actually face many options at this point. I hope Anthony will prove pleased with at least some of this. I think his work is basically validated by it, despite some problematic differences. I anticipate feedback, MAYBE, from some other brilliant friends. But living American musicologists do not yet accept anything I’ve done. Ernest

       

      From: Richard Heath [mailto:unigram@...]
      Sent: Monday, April 30, 2012 8:13 AM
      To: Ernest McClain
      Cc: 'Anthony Blake'; 'Duane Christensen'; 'David Crookes'; 'Donal B Buchanan'; diotima245@...; Gerald M. Turchetto; 'Vivian Ramalingam'; 'Sarah B. Reichart'; jbremer@...; 'John Hakim'; 'T W Gregory'
      Subject: Re: My first effort at an intro for HARMONIC EXPLORER

       

      Dear Ernest, It is interesting to see, in your attached "work in its own right" Adventures with HARMONIC EXPLORER, that all texts have therein become a backdrop for the musicology that gave birth to them unlike your many latter day essays where one text is usually interpreted through your musicology: I think it strengthens your case. My sort of "changes" would merely be how to integrate the sections with HE, each other and possibly web definitions.

      No one does it like you: there is an amazing density of information here, beautifully put, the text being filled with delightful asides (HE being named after Pythagoras, the faker of every experiment) and you perform an education of the sensibilities as well as of the technicalities. Your document is a course and I learnt a lot from a single reading.

      Anyway, I think it is time to place this material in its own web domain and the "authentic fake" can already be found at http://harmonicexplorer.org/. We might continue to have HE himself as the front page and develop HE's "help system" through one or more links within it, to pages lying "behind" HE. Otherwise, HE might be mistaken for a website rather than an application. A website could still exist below HE containing more than help such as articles, books available, etc, but at some stage the notion of ownership (of the site), its purpose, and purported authority could likely become a problem (for others) if a suitable pretext has not been agreed. Whatever the future, this domain usefully separates Harmonic Explorer from communications at http://matrixofcreation.co.uk that can refer to it. Richard.

      Regarding 'Plato postulates "Chance" as also a deity', J.G.Bennett wrote a booklet called Hazard (http://www.bennettbooks.org) based on evidence for there having been an ancient doctrine of universal hazard very relevant to the present day:

      Few people who have read my book, The Dramatic Universe, have seen that the suggestion that there is a fundamental uncertainty in the very existence of the universe, including ourselves, is entirely revolutionary and undermines beliefs that have been taken for granted equally by religious and scientific people. As the years go by, I become more and more convinced that the doctrine of universal hazard must, before long, replace our belief in absolutes of any kind. That is why I have decided to speak about this doctrine at this particular stage of my life. [In 1967, Bennett was 70 years old.]

      I do not believe that the doctrine of hazard is entirely new; there is plenty of evidence that its importance was understood and grasped thousands of years ago. It has since been lost, and only now is it due to re-enter human thought as a guiding principle in understanding what the world is all about. For this reason, I propose to start by going back about 4,700 years, that is, to about 2800 B.C., when the Sumerian culture was at its peak. This was an extraordinary period in human history. Some of you may have seen in the museum in Baghdad examples of the games that were played by the Sumerians at the height of the glory of Sumer and Akkad. One of the games they played will introduce my theme.

      Why should we start with a game? Nowadays, games are devised in any old way just to amuse people or give them opportunities for trying their skills, but in ancient times, games had a quite different role: They were invented by specialists to express and preserve certain knowledge. These specialists knew that people would continue to play a good game – and, in fact subsequent history has proved how far-sighted were those inventors of games in the remote past. Games that were invented in Sumerian times – and many of our modern games indeed have their origin as far back as that – have preserved certain insights that were subsequently lost.

      The game that I am going to talk about is the game we call backgammon, which in the Middle East is called "tric-trac." This game consists of moving a number of disks of wood or ivory from a starting point to a goal and depends upon finding a hole into which it is possible to move. The player is not permitted to move at will into the available holes; this is left to the arbitration of the dice, which in Sumerian times stood for the chance that enters into every natural process. This game is really a representation of a cosmic doctrine that has been lost, rediscovered, and lost again. It was lost in the nineteenth century and is being rediscovered in the twentieth century. The principle of the game of backgammon is that one has a certain path to traverse, and one traverses this path by moving from available hole to available hole, however, one does so under the control of an uncertain factor introduced by the throw of dice.

      The word "die" in the old Akkadian language was zar, which was retained, and appears in Arabic and Turkish with the prefix al, that is the definite article "the." It became azzar, which simply means "the die." When, during the Crusades, the French picked up this game (learning to play it during the siege of one of the cities of Syria), they called the game by the name the Saracens used, "azzar." Thus, the word became "azar" in the Spanish language; it came into our Enlgish language as the word "hazard." I have chosen the word "hazard" for my title partly for this historical reason and also as a reminder of the way in which this knowledge about the place of hazard in our lives has been handed down for thousands of years.

      This fundamental knowledge disappears from time to time because there is something in man that is both terribly attracted by hazard and at the same time terrified of it. We are driven to seek ways of denying the reality of hazard and of looking beyond chance to something that is free from chance. Man has always tended to project onto his conceptions of God the notion of a being that is beyond hazard, a supreme power that is secure from the chance and the uncertainty that we see in this world. Conversely, when people have seen the evidence that there is nothing exempt from hazard, they have been led to deny the god who was to offer them a safe refuge from hazard. To identify God with safety, though, is not necessary for our religious sense, and this is one of the important ideas I will discuss. We need not say more about it at this point except to note that it is vital to realize that we have this ambiguous attitude toward hazard and we are very ready to run after anything that proclaims certainty – just as they ran in the nineteenth century after the certainty that appeared to be offered by the laws of nature. [...]

      this part of http://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php?topic=11829.0



      On 28/04/2012 23:52, Ernest McClain wrote:

      Treat as you will and must. All of you are capable of improving this, and endless alternative approaches are possible. Please do NOT distribute until at least Richard Heath has a chance to modify to please himself. If you have something valuable to say, please CC everybody to spare me the effort to keep friends informed. I have never been surrounded by more competence. Ernest

       

    • Pete Dello
      Ernest, I don t think you have included the actual attachment Adventures With The Harmonic Explorer on here. Is there any way one can access it?Pete To:
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 30, 2012
        Ernest, I don't think you have included the actual attachment 'Adventures With The Harmonic Explorer' on here. Is there any way one can access it?
        Pete


        To: duanechristensen@...; gmturch@...; vivian@...; sbreichart@...; bibal@yahoogroups.com; babette.babich@...
        From: ernestmcc@...
        Date: Mon, 30 Apr 2012 14:47:22 -0400
        Subject: [bibal] FW: My first effort at an intro for HARMONIC EXPLORER

         

        I think I need to share this with other friends who are trying to help. Ernest

         

        From: Ernest McClain [mailto:ErnestMcC@...]
        Sent: Monday, April 30, 2012 9:56 AM
        To: 'Richard Heath'
        Subject: RE: My first effort at an intro for HARMONIC EXPLORER

         

        Dear Richard: I read your first reaction with much interest. I’m totally dedicated to Sumer myself, and the Gilgamesh epic fully supports your notions here. I started with Plato, trying to suppress all else, because of the vast attention to his work that I believe corrupts all of us by its oversights, but establishes a facticity that anchors my investigation. I omitted two critical ideas that I yet must work into my investigation, but I needed to get away from the document for a few days to recover perspective. I must introduce his “prime 7” and clarify his use of factorial 6 and factorial 7, that I believe HE can handle with the addition of no more than another page. The question then becomes, are these 6 pages too much for one unit.

         

        I can start anytime to pull the Sumerian stuff together, but it seems I should let you outline  your own thoughts first. This fits the British Museum attention to games (and Finkle’s contributions as Dumbrill’s co-editor, which I already own, and Dominique Collon’s brilliant brief book on Inana. So what you want is already on my table and ready to go. For everlasting common sense, Sumer reigns forever. And we might want to use Sumer instead of Plato as an intro to HE, but maybe not. I want us to cover every surviving Sumerian story (only about 10) and make that our real showcase. But scholarship in Plato requires this reversal of academic conceit, my current feeling. And for children just learning math, I think you and  your brother will want to lay out a basic path as you see it today. I suspect, however, that we shall find ancient algorithms too valuable to ignore in doing so.

         

        Edit as you please for now, or continue as  you propose here. I might have another reasonably good year. I’m trying to learn to walk again. I cannot handle the one flight of stairs during our fire alarms, which are periodic. Take it for granted that I can drop out at any time. My son RON is my legal representative, and would like to see me get everything possible out for free on my own website. I keep  him informed about you, and I anticipate a smooth cooperation between you if one is necessary. Duane Christensen has a complete file of my productions in the last 10 years, and permission to use any of it.  And Richard Dumbrill is now publishing my second big essay with the musical math, and so has copyright interests that require respect. But I see nothing that need cause you concern—but you are far more alert to web politics and laws.

         

        I will read my own HE Intro again in another day or two, hoping for further comments from you before I correct anything again. I know you have an excellent sense of organization. I thought I made considerable progress in the last three months that I’ve been working on HE. I consider your lunar zodiac the most convenient route to exploit, via India and the RgVeda also. We actually face many options at this point. I hope Anthony will prove pleased with at least some of this. I think his work is basically validated by it, despite some problematic differences. I anticipate feedback, MAYBE, from some other brilliant friends. But living American musicologists do not yet accept anything I’ve done. Ernest

         

        From: Richard Heath [mailto:unigram@...]
        Sent: Monday, April 30, 2012 8:13 AM
        To: Ernest McClain
        Cc: 'Anthony Blake'; 'Duane Christensen'; 'David Crookes'; 'Donal B Buchanan'; diotima245@...; Gerald M. Turchetto; 'Vivian Ramalingam'; 'Sarah B. Reichart'; jbremer@...; 'John Hakim'; 'T W Gregory'
        Subject: Re: My first effort at an intro for HARMONIC EXPLORER

         

        Dear Ernest, It is interesting to see, in your attached "work in its own right" Adventures with HARMONIC EXPLORER, that all texts have therein become a backdrop for the musicology that gave birth to them unlike your many latter day essays where one text is usually interpreted through your musicology: I think it strengthens your case. My sort of "changes" would merely be how to integrate the sections with HE, each other and possibly web definitions.

        No one does it like you: there is an amazing density of information here, beautifully put, the text being filled with delightful asides (HE being named after Pythagoras, the faker of every experiment) and you perform an education of the sensibilities as well as of the technicalities. Your document is a course and I learnt a lot from a single reading.

        Anyway, I think it is time to place this material in its own web domain and the "authentic fake" can already be found at http://harmonicexplorer.org/. We might continue to have HE himself as the front page and develop HE's "help system" through one or more links within it, to pages lying "behind" HE. Otherwise, HE might be mistaken for a website rather than an application. A website could still exist below HE containing more than help such as articles, books available, etc, but at some stage the notion of ownership (of the site), its purpose, and purported authority could likely become a problem (for others) if a suitable pretext has not been agreed. Whatever the future, this domain usefully separates Harmonic Explorer from communications at http://matrixofcreation.co.uk that can refer to it. Richard.

        Regarding 'Plato postulates "Chance" as also a deity', J.G.Bennett wrote a booklet called Hazard (http://www.bennettbooks.org) based on evidence for there having been an ancient doctrine of universal hazard very relevant to the present day:

        Few people who have read my book, The Dramatic Universe, have seen that the suggestion that there is a fundamental uncertainty in the very existence of the universe, including ourselves, is entirely revolutionary and undermines beliefs that have been taken for granted equally by religious and scientific people. As the years go by, I become more and more convinced that the doctrine of universal hazard must, before long, replace our belief in absolutes of any kind. That is why I have decided to speak about this doctrine at this particular stage of my life. [In 1967, Bennett was 70 years old.]

        I do not believe that the doctrine of hazard is entirely new; there is plenty of evidence that its importance was understood and grasped thousands of years ago. It has since been lost, and only now is it due to re-enter human thought as a guiding principle in understanding what the world is all about. For this reason, I propose to start by going back about 4,700 years, that is, to about 2800 B.C., when the Sumerian culture was at its peak. This was an extraordinary period in human history. Some of you may have seen in the museum in Baghdad examples of the games that were played by the Sumerians at the height of the glory of Sumer and Akkad. One of the games they played will introduce my theme.

        Why should we start with a game? Nowadays, games are devised in any old way just to amuse people or give them opportunities for trying their skills, but in ancient times, games had a quite different role: They were invented by specialists to express and preserve certain knowledge. These specialists knew that people would continue to play a good game – and, in fact subsequent history has proved how far-sighted were those inventors of games in the remote past. Games that were invented in Sumerian times – and many of our modern games indeed have their origin as far back as that – have preserved certain insights that were subsequently lost.

        The game that I am going to talk about is the game we call backgammon, which in the Middle East is called "tric-trac." This game consists of moving a number of disks of wood or ivory from a starting point to a goal and depends upon finding a hole into which it is possible to move. The player is not permitted to move at will into the available holes; this is left to the arbitration of the dice, which in Sumerian times stood for the chance that enters into every natural process. This game is really a representation of a cosmic doctrine that has been lost, rediscovered, and lost again. It was lost in the nineteenth century and is being rediscovered in the twentieth century. The principle of the game of backgammon is that one has a certain path to traverse, and one traverses this path by moving from available hole to available hole, however, one does so under the control of an uncertain factor introduced by the throw of dice.

        The word "die" in the old Akkadian language was zar, which was retained, and appears in Arabic and Turkish with the prefix al, that is the definite article "the." It became azzar, which simply means "the die." When, during the Crusades, the French picked up this game (learning to play it during the siege of one of the cities of Syria), they called the game by the name the Saracens used, "azzar." Thus, the word became "azar" in the Spanish language; it came into our Enlgish language as the word "hazard." I have chosen the word "hazard" for my title partly for this historical reason and also as a reminder of the way in which this knowledge about the place of hazard in our lives has been handed down for thousands of years.

        This fundamental knowledge disappears from time to time because there is something in man that is both terribly attracted by hazard and at the same time terrified of it. We are driven to seek ways of denying the reality of hazard and of looking beyond chance to something that is free from chance. Man has always tended to project onto his conceptions of God the notion of a being that is beyond hazard, a supreme power that is secure from the chance and the uncertainty that we see in this world. Conversely, when people have seen the evidence that there is nothing exempt from hazard, they have been led to deny the god who was to offer them a safe refuge from hazard. To identify God with safety, though, is not necessary for our religious sense, and this is one of the important ideas I will discuss. We need not say more about it at this point except to note that it is vital to realize that we have this ambiguous attitude toward hazard and we are very ready to run after anything that proclaims certainty – just as they ran in the nineteenth century after the certainty that appeared to be offered by the laws of nature. [...]

        this part of http://cassiopaea.org/forum/index.php?topic=11829.0



        On 28/04/2012 23:52, Ernest McClain wrote:

        Treat as you will and must. All of you are capable of improving this, and endless alternative approaches are possible. Please do NOT distribute until at least Richard Heath has a chance to modify to please himself. If you have something valuable to say, please CC everybody to spare me the effort to keep friends informed. I have never been surrounded by more competence. Ernest

         


      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.